Félix Feider

About Félix Feider

Programme Officer - Research Team

Félix joined Synchronicity Earth in October 2020 as Programme Officer. He gathered extensive knowledge of conservation science and environmental policy and governance during his time at the Secretariats of the UN Convention on Migratory Species and the UN Convention on Biological Diversity, where he contributed to the 5th Edition of the Global Biodiversity Outlook, and at the UN Environment Programme World Conservation Monitoring Centre, where he spearheaded a collaboration to develop the world’s first database on systematic conservation planning. Originally from the Grand-Duchy of Luxembourg, Félix moved abroad to complete an undergraduate degree in marine sciences in Ireland and Hong Kong and moved to London to complete a master's degree in Conservation at University College London. Félix has been active in the environmental youth movement in Europe and beyond within the UNEP Major Group for Children and Youth, the Global Youth Biodiversity Network, Biodiversity Action Europe, Generation Climate Europe and Youth and Environment Europe. Félix brings an understanding of the complex and context-specific scientific, socio-political and economic aspects of the biodiversity crisis to the team which meaningfully contributes to the impact driven work of Synchronicity Earth and its partners.

An overlooked ecosystem: seagrass meadows

When we think about important habitats, we often imagine a coral reef, a tropical rainforest or maybe the African savannah. But there are many less celebrated, often overlooked ecosystems that are equally deserving of our attention: these habitats help regulate our climate, stock our food supplies and supply us with clean water, and are [...]

By , |2021-12-09T10:56:31+00:00October 26th, 2021|Marine Programme, Seagrass|Comments Off on An overlooked ecosystem: seagrass meadows

Recognising the rights of rivers

Rivers are the planet’s arteries of life and are intrinsically linked to human well-being, history, culture, spirituality and politics. Yet, our legal system has largely proven to be ill-equipped to protect the world’s rivers and their inhabitants. A growing global movement sets out to change this by legally recognising and implementing the inherent rights [...]

By |2021-03-22T12:17:25+00:00March 19th, 2021|Freshwater, Indigenous Peoples, Rivers|Comments Off on Recognising the rights of rivers